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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus
to the upside. investors missed it. this documenthe stock then begio freefall of a series of bad news in science perhaps the tragedy is not working. melissa: it is like a palm. charles: september 2012, deficient in knowledge, the stock rebounds. this is ron johnson, the guy who invented the genius bar. november 2012, this guy gives a sort of talks to the industry, everybody says i have a strategy, know what works, the stock tumbles, craters to $16 per share. bringing us to today. it is not confirmed, but maybe ron johnson is leaving the company. think about that for a moment of the stock is up on strong volume. just imaaine that. for the craziest reason of all going back a few years ago. melissa: what was the nauseous? >> missing the rally. lori: what is a good color tomorrow? sandracharles: what was the colf the year this year? melissa: tangerine? charles: of course. melissa: i am lucky. lori: i've never even heard that be described as a color. charles: tangerine. all right. lori: let's check the market with nicole watching wall street. nicole: watching green. looking at men's warehouse. a comp
and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. (vo) always outspoken, now >> on my next show, fashion savant carson kressley goes from dancing with the stars to dishing with moi, on say anything. [ music ] >> bill: here we go, monday morning, focusing on the one person standing in the way of any fix of the fiscal cliff and that is john boehner. time for him to lead. john boehner ought to go to his caucus and say, hey, they won. we lost. we now look like a bunch of clowns because 98% of americans are going to get a tax cut, a continued tax cut on january 1st unless we stop it. and why should we block that? bill kristol who is as conservative as you can get, former chief of staff for dan quail, publisher of "the weekly standard" weekly on fox news, he said after the election on november 11th, he laid it out there. >> float new ideas. let's have a serious debate. don't scribek scream and yell. it won't kill country if we raise taxes on millionaires. i don't sundays why republicans don't
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. we have important breaking news. nbc news is reporting u.s. officials say their worst fears have been confirmed the syrian military has loaded chemical weapons inside bombs. nbc says those same officials say bashar al assad's forces are awaiting final order to use those loaded missiles against syria's own people. this video posted online, which we can't independently verify, purports to show syrian missiles that have been modified to carry chemical and biological weapons. obviously, this is a sober development in a situation that seems to be getting worse by the day. pentagon correspondent barbara starr joins me along with cnn contributor and former cia officer bob baer and on the phone fran townsend. barbara, i know you're working to confirm this nbc report. how much would this change the situation? if u.s. military is going to act to prevent assad from gassing his own people, it would seem, if they loaded this stuff into weapons, the time to do it would be at hand. >> right now i can t
-level political science classes in college. you talk about the rationale act or model. assuming al assad is a rational actor, even if he thinks he may lose and need a place to go some day like russia or be able to live in exile somewhere, just rationally speaking, it would not make sense for him to use these weapons, would it? >> well, we have to look at the generals around him. he's not alone in this. he's not a single man making these decisions. there are a group of generals from his own promotion which are controlling this war. they are not being offered a way out. you know, and the way they look at it, i've spent a lot of time with these people. they're virtually a cult. they think their survival's at stake. even if the united states were to enter in any sort of -- you know, to go in and get the weapons, that would be a better option for them than to losing to the rebels who they consider terrorists, fundamentalists, whatever you want. and their chances are dimming by the day. and they're very desperate and they are this closed-in mentality. it's unpredictable exactly what they're go
an extension of science and technology, but i wanted to know what it meant to us, to humanity, to us then and to generations in the future, and i wasn't sure, but all i knew is that the world and the earth and the small part of the universe that i was privileged to see was not an accident, that there is a creator of this universe. and i had the opportunity, a few others have to sit on god's front porch and see a small part of it. and that's what i came home w. the science and technology is obsolete the next day, but the spirit, the meaning, and what neil just said a minute ago, it proved that period of time proved that individually and collectively as a nation we dedicate ourselves to a cause, there is nothing, nothing absolutely that we can't do. all we've got to do is decide to do it, whether it's go to the moon or solve the world crisis, forget off this financial cliff, or whatever, we have to be bold, be bold. bill: thank you, gene. really appreciate that. >> god bless. bill: check it out. job well done. check it out. fly me in the moon here on the fox news channel 9:00 eastern t
, no matter what happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. >> eliot: i'm back with dan gross of "newsweek" and the daily beast. brian beutler and eric bates. i want to start out with the financial trend financial packs that i mentioned earlier in the show. dan, would that be a bad idea? a good idea? something that we should think about and hold in reserve for another day. >> i actually think it's a good idea. the economists say if you want something less of something tax it more. if we want less speculation and less out of control training by these crazy machines that are doing hundreds of thousands of trades a day to capture a fraction of a penny in economic gains, taxes it would discourage those and raise a fair amount of money in a fairly painless way in trading. >> eliot: would this be an useful compromise point? you want the capital markets to be liquid. you want to allocate capital efficiently among businesses and he cansectors. all of that used to happen before the hedge fund that were driven by computers. you could butt a transaction tax it on
return, a sharp increase in the number of scanners filing fraudulent returns. science and technology editor is with us now. it looks like they have stolen tens of thousands of people's refunds. >>guest: potentially billions. part of the problem, is identifying that there is a problem. the i.r.s. says they do not know the extent of the problem and it is hard if them to track and identify that something like this is happening. >>shepard: explain what going on. >>guest: it has me disgusted. identity scammers buying something in a store is one thing but they filing fraudulent tax runs, that is something else. >>shepard: they would file my tax returns using their address and if i had a refund it would come back to them? >>guest: exactly. the challenge comes in because if you are like me you find out you getting a refund and you file as soon as you can and you can file in january. businesses and financial institutions do thought have to file their information with the government until the end of march. often the i.r.s. doesn't have the information it needs to verify or crosscheck what has
in classroom, in science and literature and geography, these are the early days 1980. our subjects were replaced by government propaganda. i had grown up readingern necessary hemmingway and poetry and now i had to face propaganda eight hours a day and i was 14 years old. what do you think when having fun becomes illegal? how political can a 14-year-old get? but you the 14-year-old becomes political. that was the basis of all the protests that began in iran as early as 1980. now, sharia law came into iran very early after the revolution, and under sharia law democracy and freedom of the citizen is impossible. the thing of sharia law that govern iran in 1979 and 1980 are still in place. they're have something cosmetic changes here and there depending on what administration is president of iran. if you wore nail polish you could get away with it. but does that really make a big difference? does that mean that iran becomes free and independent are in khamenei? no. under this constitution freedom and democracy in iran is impossible. i'm sure you all know about the american hostages. everybod
. electrical grids that bind us together. we will restore science to its rightful place and raise health care quality and lower cost. we will harness the sun and the wind to run our factories and will transform our schools and colleges to meet the demands of a new age. all of this we can do. all of this we will do. there are some who question the scale of our ambitions to suggest our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what this country has already done. what it free men and women can achieve when imagination joins a common purpose. host: his inaugural address from january 2009. the question is, as the president moves to a second term, what is your number one priority? the number one agenda item you think he needs to address? danny is joining us from west virginia on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. the first issue and the core of all of our problems is the free trade we have been engaging in for the last 20 years. if you look at the jobs numbers and how long it takes to recover from the sessions, the clear issue is our jobs have
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that by january 1st. >> and it can be done. chris, this is not rocket science. that piece is very easy to -- >> but once you do that, why don't you admit you're not -- you're going to let the top rates go back to 39.6%. >> you can do that, but this is the kicker. the republicans want to see that they're actually going to get something in the bargain that's going to be real and genuine, not the promise for cuts in entitlement spending four or five congresses from now but in the next -- >> let's talk turkey. everybody on the shows do it their way. i want to do it a certain way. >> of course. >> of course. sarcasm won't stop you, might not have you back here again. i'm just kidding. you're invaluable. let's go with this thing. during the cuban missile crisis kennedy and khrushchev were communicating through different ways. kennedy was trying to communicate i will do it this way. this won't work for you stick, this will work for you. then he threw in turkey. so they found ways to communicate. is there a communication going on head to head between the president and the speaker right now? >>
there's something to find, something is alive. >> what does a 2-year-old care about science? not much but my son has so much fun exploring that he doesn't realize his brain is learning too. >>> have you ever been asked to check off one of those boxes that describes your ethnicity, you probably noticed there's a box called other. other. sort of an unusual thing to say about yourself. i'm an other. in fact, there's a young poet who is so disturbed by that, she decided to write a poem about it because for her part she said she was too light skinned for black kids she grew up around to avoid teasing and taunts and it still haunts her today. soledad o'brien has more. >> reporter: it's a poem about her life. she is struggling to recite it. >> they always called me white girl. i was never ashamed of myself until she taught me to be ashamed. she calls her poem other or the biracial poem. it's about being bullied by black kids for being light skinned. >> i remember their taunts. it took years to fade. i became ashamed. >> reporter: the tough part. she has to perform it at the first spoken word
competing to win the army's next multi-million dollar contract. he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. we're trying to trick the brain into seeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital patterns recreate shapes already found in nature, and 3-d layering creates depth and shad dose where none exist. that's today's design. but developers already have one eye on tomorrow. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make believe. the military has seen the so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the americ
change between natural gas and coal is still somewhat a question mark. it looks based on most science we have now cleaner than coal, but we just don't know. we don't know a lot about the local impacts and how long these prices stay low or how long the wells last. there's a lot wi don't know about it, and it's moving so quickly. i think that's why you see a lot of of this. >> there's a lot of fear. >> and you're someone who is familiar with this. you live in upstate. you consulted for the oil and gas industry and you're a toxicologist, right? what are the fears you hear, and what's yue feeling about how people are understanding the process? >> people are not understanding the process at at all. the information is out there. the industry has been doing this for a while. they have the information, but the problem is a lot of people don't believe what the industry says. so even if the industry -- >> which is not ridiculous. let me just say it for the record, right? this is just as a basic kind of -- i think you're right. what ends up happening is you get this debate, right? the natural gas c
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. dennis: 15 past the hour, stocks every 15 minutes. team coverage. cheryl: phil flynn in the trading pits of the cme where gasoline futures are tanking and sandra walking earnings and nicole petallides, for the stock exchange where stocks are higher by a little bit so something to go on. nicole: we are trend mr. king a little higher, not far off of the line, like apple has been lower and back in the green and helping the tech heavy nasdaq shows in green arrows and been under significant pressure. dow jones industrials crossing the unchanged line again and again, worries about fiscal cliff tomorrow is the all-important jobs report. right now you see the dow up fractionally, up about 10 points. that is the latest on the floor of the stock exchange. was going on at the cme? phil: the day after the biggest gasoline inventory build in 15 years gasoline futures are up, trading close to 0 one month low. they're under a lot fresher this morning not only from that mas
of medicinal marijuana. technicians sort, ammize and distill the plant. it's science here. and they believe it will help children with severe autism, ep department sy and cancer. >> we have seen more than one child like jayden who came to us with very, very serious, severe life threatening illnesses who as soon as they started using cannabis medicine draw a dramatic turnaround. >> reporter: the community says without better research most doctors opposed medical marijuana for children. >> all medications may have side effects, may have long-term consequences and unfortunately we know very little about this. >> the parent is flying by the seat of their pants in doing this. ♪ you are the world to me >> reporter: call him crazy, unethical, this father heard it all except for one phrase. >> all i want is my son to say i love you, dad. can you say i love you? that's all i want to hear. i'm really close. >> reporter: close to final hi reaching his son. >> washington state has a first in history moment today with the recreational use of marijuana going in to effect and also marking another first.
could lose their jobs and science and public research grants could be cut including in to cancer and childhood diseases. fewer americans could receive drug abuse treatment and $700 million slashed from the epa budget. cutting back of food inspection. disaster relief, omb says, quote, the federal emergency management administration's ability to respond would be undermined. and finally, from border patrol to hiring new fbi agents, correction officers, federal prosecutors, all could be scaled back. now, all of these cuts, brooke, don't happen exactly at 12:01 a.m. on january 2nd. they happen over the course of a year. but agencies are preparing for an impasse in washington. this is exactly, exactly what policymakers are trying to avoid. brooke? >> thank you. >>> shock waves in washington today. powerful republican senator calling it quits. south carolina's senator jim demint will be stepping down december 31st to lead the heritage foundation. that's a powerful conservative think tank in d.c. demint says he can be more effective outside the senate. >> a lot of my role in the senate h
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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